Lesson Plan : Simplifying Fractions at Fractionville

Teacher Name:
 Ms. Olson
Grade:
 Grade 6
Subject:
 Math

Topic:
 Simplifying Fractions
Content:
 Simplification, fractions, greatest common factor (GCF) KEY POINTS: *Simplifying fractions involves factoring/multiplication and division. *Simplifying a fraction CANNOT occur if the numerator and the denominator do not have a common multiple, or factor. *PROCESS: Find out if there is a common multiple between the numerator and the denominator. If there is, divide each by that number. This becomes your simplified or reduced fraction.
Goals:
 Advance student towards understanding and performing proficiently on the state assessment for the 6th grade in Pennsylvania. Develop students' broader understanding of the simplification process and fractions.
Objectives:
 SWBAT simplify fractions.
Materials:
 simplifying fractions worksheet (generated at www.edhelper.com) "postcard"/construction paper; dry erase boards/markers; DO NOW/Warm-up prompt
Introduction:
 1. “Do Now” Activity (4’): What patterns do you see in the following fractions and their equivalents: 8/12 = 2/3 4/8 = ½ 2/8=1/4 *After 2 minutes: If you need a hint, raise your hand. Prompt: “How do you get from 4 to 1, and from 8 to 2?” 2. Class Share (4’): Share answers 3. We have discovered that we can get a smaller equivalent fraction by dividing the numerator and denominator by the same number. We have to find a number that is a FACTOR OF BOTH. 12/12 …. 1/11 (any shortcut? 12 right away. Why? Because it is the GCF in the first place – the largest factor that both numerator and denominator have in common.
Development:
 1. Simplifying fractions requires multiplication and division. 2. It requires our knowledge of multiples, which we worked a bit on during our Monday BUZZ game with 1, 2, 4, and 6. Those multiples and more will come in handy right here in simplifying fractions, so if that comes difficult to you, let me know, and I can help you find games at home online or with stuff I have to help you work on that. Otherwise, we will start with simplifying fractions! 3. 2 Examples: Using 6/8 as our first example, we will break this down to see if we can simplify this fraction. Factors of 6: 2 x 3 Factors of 8: 2 x 4 (or even further broken down: 2 x 2 x 2) SO, we know that 6 and 8 both have a common multiple of 2, which means we can simplify. Next, we divide each number by 2 to get rid of it. 6/2 = 3 8/2 = 4 SO, we are left with 3 and 4, making ¾, our new simplified value. --- Let’s try one that CANNOT be simplified (in other words, it’s already simplified): 5/28 is our example Factors of 5: 1 x 5 Factors of 14: 7 x 2 SO, we see that there are NO COMMON MULTIPLES between 5 and 14, which means we cannot simplify because it is already simplified. So, our answer would be 5/14, or “simplified.”
Practice:
 1. Simplify the following numbers together as a class (work the process): #1-10 of edhelper.com WS together.
Accommodations:
 Small groups during guided and/or independent practice will help to personalize instruction more to the needs of students. Teacher can float and clarify/instruct on various levels of math performance.
Checking For Understanding:
 Check the independent practice as a whole class or in small groups with peers. Clarify misunderstandings, re-teach as necessary.
Closure:
 Postcard Activity or Exit Slip activity (see EVALUATION section for more details)
Evaluation:
 Write a Postcard to your friend or family member, as if you were visiting “Fractionville – Where life is simplified.” Just like a postcard, you want to address it, and sign it, and write to whom you are sending, but in the body of the note, you want to explain to your friend/family what it means that life is SIMPLIFIED in Fractionville. This means that you will tell your reader HOW to simplify a fraction. In however many words you need, or pictures you need, you must do this in the next 5-7 minutes so that they will know how to simplify a fraction if you sent them the postcard and that was it. CAP: You must say what it means to be “simplified”; you must have at least one example worked out to show what you are writing, and have concrete steps that your reader will be able to do. This way, your friend/family will WANT to visit Fractionville, knowing that simplified life is the way to go! Any questions? *Pass out “postcards”; When you are done, re-read it to make sure that your instructions are clear and easy to understand, raise your hand, and I will come to collect it. *If students have not shown proficiency/good behavior, do Exit Slips* Exit Slips: Simplify the following fractions. Show work in terms of finding the numerator and denominator’s multiples. If a fraction is already simplified, write “simplified.” Example: 6/8 {[X][X][X][X][X][X][ ][ ]} = {[X][X][X][ ]} + {[X][X][X][ ]} Both 6 and 8 are multiples of 2 (6: 2, 4, 6 & 8: 2, 4, 6, 8), so we divide 6/2=3 and 8/2=4, so our simplified fraction is ¾) 7. 2/4 8. 3/6 9. 5/15 10. 7/11 (not the store, but the fraction! ^-^)

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