Lesson Plan : Proper Nouns

Teacher Name:
 Miss. Dolan
Grade:
 Grade 2
Subject:
 Language Arts

Topic:
 Capitalization of proper nouns
Content:
 Mike pen Chris park New York tie Monroe black Jones Beach beach Game Boy Cheerios
Goals:
 1.The students will understand that proper nouns are capitalized 2.The students will understand how to create a class website 3.The students will know how to utilize on-line self assessment
Objectives:
 - Given a sentence, the students will correctly locate and circle a proper noun that is not capitalized for at least eight out of ten sentences. - Given an on-line self assessment, the students will read 10 sentences and correctly write on paper the proper nouns that should be capitalized with no more than one error. - Given an on-line assessment as a model, students will create their own assessment/game writing 4 out of 5 questions correct. - Given HW of student made assessment and the direction, students will create an on-line study website with minimal teacher support.
Materials:
 Computers for all students Picture of the sun for the board (“yes” will be written in the sun) Picture of a rain cloud for board (“no” will be written in the cloud) 2 Blindfolds Cheerios
Introduction:
 Before the lesson begins the teacher will place 5 single cheerios in a covered paper cup on each desk, the children will be told that they cannot look in the cup until they are told to, that it is a surprise and it might help them with an answer, but only when the time comes. The teacher will start out by saying “FAST, someone give me a word” (the teacher will listen to responses). A student will shout out the word “cat”, the teacher will then ask, “what kind of a word is cat?” The students will say “it is a noun”. The teacher will then say “someone give me another word”, a student will respond “bite”, the teacher will go on to ask “and what kind of a word is that?” The students will respond, “It is a verb!” This will go on for approximately 3-5 minutes. The teacher will take a few seconds to explain that Word Detectives are great at finding specific kinds of words, emphasizing the importance of writing and knowing what a noun, verb, etc. are. The teacher will also tell the students that they will get a chance to be a Word Detective. The teacher will praise all of the students for doing a great job.
Development:
 - The teacher will start by saying “I have a yes and no column on the board. I am going to show you some words and you need to tell me whether you think it is a yes or a no. You have to try to figure out what the yes’ are. In other words, why are they yes’?” - The teacher will then hold up the word Mike (the word will be written in red, etc.) and say, "this is a yes". The teacher will then tape the word Mike under the sun (yes column). - The teacher will then hold up the word Chris and say “okay everyone thumbs up for yes and thumbs down for no, take a look at this word, is this a yes or a no?” The students will respond with thumbs up. The teacher will ask a student why they think the word Chris is a yes. The students will say, "Because it is a person’s name." - The teacher will then hold up the word pen and say “get your thumbs ready, is this a yes or a no”? The students will respond with a thumbs down. They will say it is a no because it is not a persons name. - The teacher will then hold up a card that says New York on it and ask again “is this a yes or a no? Show me your thumbs.” The students will show that they think it is a no. The teacher will say “this is a yes.” - The teacher will do the same with the word park and with the word tie (being no’s). - The teacher will then tell the children to look at the yes column and have them tell her why they think the words there are yes’. The teacher will write on the board the responses and will do the same for the no column. The responses for the yes’ might be as follows: they are names, they are capitalized, and they are all different colors. For the no’s they might say: they are written in black only, they are not capitalized, they are not names. - The teacher will then call two volunteers up to the front of the room and put blindfolds on them. The teacher will then say, “okay, feel this word (foam letters), and try to tell me if it is a yes or a no.” After the students have felt the letters and outlined them with their fingers the blindfolds will be taken off. The teacher will say “what was the word you felt? (will listen to response and then show the word (Monroe) to them), is this word a yes or a no?” The students will have thumbs down. When asked why, they will say the word is written in black. The teacher will say, “Are you sure? This word is a yes!” The teacher will ask, “Why is this word Monroe a yes? Take a close look at the yes column and see what makes sense.” The students will respond, “Because the “M” is capitalized. - The teacher will do the same thing with two other students (blind fold) with the word black. The children will say that it is a no because is not capitalized. - The teacher will hold up the words, Jones Beach and ask, is this a yes or a no? The word will be placed under the yes column. The teacher will ask why it is a yes. The student’s response will be, “because it is the name of a place that we go to. - The teacher will put up the word beach. The teacher will tell the students to show their thumbs. The students will have a thumbs down for no. The teacher will ask why is the word beach a no but the word Jones Beach a yes. The response will be because Jones Beach is the name of a place and it is capitalized, and for the no we do not know what beach. - The teacher will then hold up the words Game Boy. The students will say that it is a yes. The teacher will ask why and the response will be, “because it is capitalized”. The teacher will ask, “Why is it capitalized?” The response will be, “because it is a thing that we play with.” - The teacher will hold up the word Cheerios. She will hold the word and tell the children to see what is in their paper cups on the desk. The teacher will have the children taste the cheerios to see if it will help them tell them if it is a yes or a no. The teacher will say, “Okay so is this word a yes or a no? The children will put thumbs up. The teacher will ask why and the students will respond, “Because it is something that we can eat and it has a big “C”!” - The teacher will tell the students to take a look at the board at the reasons they listed earlier for the yes’. The teacher will say, “Are they still names? (students say yes) Are they all capitalized still? (students will say yes) Are they all different colors only?” (The students will say no, some are black). The teacher will then erase that from the list of attributes. She will then ask, “What other things do you see about the yes column?” The teacher will listen to responses and if needed guide them to say and think that it is a list of a person, place and thing. - The teacher will then praise the children for figuring out what the yes’ are. The teacher will then say “they are called proper nouns” (the teacher will write “proper nouns” on the board. “Proper nouns are always capitalized and are names of people, places we go, and things. Capital words are important because capital letters help us to understand what we read. It also shows that a name, person, place or thing is special.
Practice:
 - The students will be assigned to a computer for themselves or in pairs and take turns (depending on the amount of computers). - The computers will be already set on a teacher made website on proper nouns (http://www.geocities.com/colleenglassey/propernoun.html). The students will listen to the teacher’s direction and read along on the computer screen. (Attached) - The directions will say- Pretend that you are a Word Detective for second grade teachers. Your job is to play this proper noun game. Write your answers on paper. To see how good of a word detective you are, click on the green go arrow to check your answer. - As the students are playing this “game” (self assessment), the teacher will be walking around observing and offering guidance if needed. The teacher will also walk around and ask why they chose an answer for a given question.
Accommodations:
 If I have a student that has a motor disability I will implement the Eye-gaze Computer System. This vision controlled device allows students with motor disabilities to do many things with their eyes that they cannot do with their hands. Simply by looking at keys on a computer screen, the user can perform tasks such as speaking synthetically, playing games, studying lessons, or writing papers. With this, the student will be able to join in with the guided practice with his/her peers.
Checking For Understanding:
 A rubric will be utilized to help assess whether the students understood the lesson by whether or not they were able to defend the answers that they chose during the guided practice. Feedback will be given on the spot.
Closure:
 The teacher will ask, “What did we learn today?” The teacher will listen to the student responses. The teacher will then ask, “What is a proper noun?” The students will respond, “A person, place or thing that is capitalized.” The teacher will praise the students and then ask for examples. The teacher will listen to examples. The teacher will then write a few examples on the board and say which one is a proper noun: - John or boy - Krissy or girl - Disney Word or park - Jeep Liberty or truck
Evaluation:
 The progress will be measure by a rubric from how well the students did during the guided practice and how well they did on their independent practice.

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