Lesson Plan : Rhythm Tree

Teacher Name:
 Kathy Neri
Grade:
 Grade 6
Subject:
 Music

Topic:
 Beginning Rhythms - How much are rhythms worth? How did rhythms get their names?
Content:
 Rhythms. Vocabulary: whole note, half note, quarter note, eighth note, whole rest, half rest, quarter rest and eighth rest Prior Knowledge: singing rhythms by rote using echoing, and decoding
Goals:
 Students will be able to read music rhythms and understand their relationship to one another.
Objectives:
 Students will make three column notes in their journal to use as a reference defying notes/rests/ symbols and counting in simple meters.. students will make a rhythm tree showing rhythm values.
Materials:
 Journals for note taking Markers, rulers and oak tag paper for projects.
Introduction:
 Class will begin with clapping various patterns of rhythms. Next, we will review what rhythms are called by doing a question/answer session in regards to name this rhythm.
Development:
 Next, we will begin taking three column notes on all of the notes/rests. Notes will be structured by note and then rest ( whole note followed by whole rest, half note followed by half rest, etc..) Once students have written all of the notes in their journals we will begin our rhythm trees.
Practice:
 question/answer session in regards to value will guide the rhythm tree's progress. What is the biggest value we have in music? (the whole note). Let's put the whole note at the top. How much is it worth? (4 beats) 4 x ? = 4. Next we will draw two branches, (because the basic music values are always cut in half). who can tell me what value takes two to equal the whole note? (the half notes). Answer/question: who can tell me why did they call the half note a "half note"? (One half note is 1/2 the value of the whole note) Each half note is drawn beneath the branches. Question is then asked, "Who can tell me how much is a half note worth? 2 x ? = 4. Counting will then be placed underneath each note in 4/4 time. Again we draw two branches beneath each half note, (because the basic music values are always cut in half) and ask the question, "who can tell me what takes two to equal the half note and four to equal the whole note?" (the quarter note). Who can tell me why these notes are called quarter notes (one quarter note is worth 1/4 the value of the whole note). How much is each quarter note worth? 4 x ? = 4. Counting will then be placed underneath each quarter note in 4/4 time. Next, two branches are again drawn beneath each quarter note. "Who can tell me what takes two to equal the quarter note, four to equal the half note, and eight to equal the whole note? (the eighth note) 8 x _ = 4 the value of the eighth note is reflected upon by using this equation on the board. The answer is 1/2. Next we talk about how do we count something that equals a half in music and then place the counting underneath each note. "Who can tell me why these notes are called eighth notes?" ( one eighth note is equal to 1/8 the value of the whole note 8 x 1/2 = 4.)
Accommodations:
 rhythm trees are drawn and students need to count underneath each note value.
Checking For Understanding:
 Assessment will be done by viewing the rhythm trees and asking various questions throughout the lesson.
Closure:
 In looking at their rhythm trees the following questions are asked to end the lesson. 1. Who is the ruler of the rhythm tree? 2. How did all of the other rhythms get their names? (In relation to their rhythmic value in comparison to the whole note.) 3. How many quarter notes does it take to equal a whole note? How many quarter notes does it take to equal a half note? How many eighth notes does it take to equal a quarter note, a half note, a whole note?

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