Lesson Plan : To Kill a Mockingbird - Standing Up for the Right

Teacher Name:
 M. I. Friedman
Grade:
 Grade 11-12
Subject:
 Literature Activities

Topic:
 Standing Up for the Right
Content:
 Lesson is an examination of Atticus Finch's reasons for defending Tom Robinson. Atticus is handed an unpopular case--to defend a Negro against a charge of raping a white girl. Atticus takes the case because it is the right thing to do. As he tells Scout, if he did not take the case he would not be able to hold his head up, and he could never again tell Scout and Jem what to do.
Goals:
 Aim: How can we determine what it means to stand up for what we believe is right? Outcomes: Students will explore Atticus's reasons for defending Tom Robinson. Through this examination they will come to understand the nature of personal integrity and pride. They will understand the consequences of doing what is right--especially when it is the unpopular course of action.
Objectives:
 Students will be able to gain insight into the Tom Robinson case, and understand why Atticus takes it; they will be able to provide their personal explanation of what it means to stand up for what they believe is right.
Materials:
 1. To Kill a Mockingbird 2. "Pros and Cons of Taking the Tom Robinson Case" handout (Two Column Graphic Organizer) 3. "Pros and Cons of Taking the Tom Robinson Case" chart (model)
Introduction:
 Quick Write: Briefly explain what you think it means to stand up for what you believe is right. What might some consequences of standing up for what you believe is right? Turn and Talk: Have the students share their responses with a partner, or their group.
Development:
 Classroom Discussion: Engage the class in a discussion of what they think it means to stand up for what they believe to be right. Independent Reading: 1. Have the students read chapter nine. 2. Have the students copy the reasons that Atticus gives for defending Tom Robinson. Tell them that they are to explain what he means by each reason. Classroom Discussion: 1. Engage the class in a discussion of their response to the question of Atticus's reasons for taking the case. How is Atticus standing up for what is right? 2. Ask the students to tell how the family's Christmas dinner is spoiled by Cousin Francis. 3. Discuss how Francis proves to be a coward. Ask the students whether they are surprised that Francis could so mean. 4. Have the students tell how Scout retailiates against Francis. 5. Ask the students to identify what Uncle Jack learns about children and fairness, from Scout. How does Scout stand up for what she believes is right?
Practice:
 1. Create a "Pros and Cons of Taking the Tom Robinson Case" chart. This is a two column graphic organizer, on which will be record the positive and negative points of taking the case. 2. Ask students why Atticus should take the case. Record one response on the chart. 3. Ask students for one reason why Atticus should not take the case. Record one response on the chart.
Accommodations:
 1. Students will be permitted to work with partners, or groups. 2. If students require extra time, allow them to hand it in with their homework. 3. Circulate, and work with students who are struggling.
Checking For Understanding:
 1. Have students share their reasons why they think Atticus should take the case. Also, have them share their reasons why they think Atticus should not take the case. 2. Ask students to use their data to determine whether they feel that Atticus should take the case.
Closure:
 Summation: 1. Ask students to write, briefly, about a time when they stood up for something they felt to be right, or that they believed in. 2. Ask students to share what they wrote. 3. List the characteristics or personality that is required to stand up for what you believe to be right. Homework: Write an editorial to the "Maycomb Monitor" expressing your opinion whether Atticus should, or should not, defend Tom Robinson. This is to be no fewer than three paragraphs.
Evaluation:
 Students ability to express their opinion, and provide supporting information to back up that opinion.

Create New Lesson Plan Lesson Plan Center


Popular Areas: Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs | Lesson Planning Blocks | Lesson Forms Pack | Lesson Writing | Teacher Forum Chat