Lesson Plan : Mapping the Garden

Teacher Name:
 Ms. Northe
Grade:
 Grade 1
Subject:
 Social Studies

Content:
 Maps are part of everyday life. Students will need to be able to read and understand the basic components of a map. Developing a map will help us organize information in a clear understandable format.
Goals:
 The purpose of this lesson is to have the studentsí gain an understanding of maps. The students will learn the components of a map, particularly the legend, the key, the symbols and the area. The students will develop their own map of a garden they will be planting in their upcoming science lesson. The students have background knowledge in mapping due to the exposure of maps in previous lessons.
Objectives:
 1. Following an oral tutorial given by the teacher on maps and their components, and a viewing of various example maps and their components, grade 2 students will correctly identify by oral response, with 100% accuracy; the components discussed using the example maps. 2. Following a group discussion on developing, arranging and assigning symbols for plants to be planted in a future gardening lesson, grade 2 students, given a blank map will be able to, with 100% accuracy, correctly copy the model map from the board with the correct corresponding symbol from the legend and key.
Materials:
 4 Maps to be used as examples 2 Maps to be used for identifying components. 25 Blank maps for constructing their own maps 25 pencils 25 packs of crayons
Introduction:
 The teacher will start a discussion by asking the students if they have ever used a map and why. The teacher will then ask the students why maps are important. The teacher will ask students if they know what the basic components of a map are and how to use them. After the students respond the teacher will discuss the importance of maps and why people use them and also discuss the basic components of a map. The teacher will then tell the students that they, as a group will be making their own class map of a garden they will be planting.
Development:
 The teacher will start by discussing the importance of maps. The teacher will ask the students the following questions: 1. What is a map? 2. Have you ever used a map and why? 3. Why are maps important? 4. Is it important to know how to read a map and why? 5. Does anyone know what the legend, key, symbols, or area is on a map? The teacher will then discuss all of the questions asked in detail. The teacher will display four examples of maps and point out the legend, key, symbols, and area on each map. The teacher will discuss what each component is used for on a map and why. The teacher will ask students if they have any questions. The teacher will then display two more examples of maps and ask the students, as a large group to identify each component discussed. The teacher will explain to the students that they will be planting a garden in the near future and will need to map out the plants that they will be planting. The teacher will explain why they need to map out the garden. The teacher will tell the students that by making a map of the garden everyone will know where to plant the plants and have a neat organized garden. The map will also be important after the plants have been planted to tell which plant has been planted where. The teacher will tell the students that they will be planting four of each of these types of plants: peppers, tomatoes, carrots and lettuce. The teacher will then distribute a blank map to the students that will have a box for the legend, key and symbols. The area of the map will have a square, two rectangles, a circle and a triangle. The teacher will draw the same map on the board and ask the students what they would like to plant in each of the shapes and come to an agreement of the arrangement. The teacher will then ask the students what type of symbol they would like to use for each plant and come to an agreement of the symbols. The teacher will then plot out the arrangement on the board using the symbols established by the class. The teacher will complete the legend and key portion on the map as well. The teacher will then instruct the students to copy the model map from the board to complete their own map. The students will use crayons to draw the symbols in the legend and key. The students will also use crayons to fill in the shapes with the correct corresponding symbol.
Closure:
 Review the components of the map and ask the students what each component is and what it is used for. Review the model of the map and ask the students if all of the components are included on the map. Review each symbol and what it represents. Review what plant will be planted in each shape. Ask the students if they have any questions about the map or the components.
Evaluation:
 The studentsí understanding of the components of the map will be informally assessed through large group participation in a class discussion. Teacher observation of individual participation in class discussion will also be used.

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